Thursday, December 16, 2010

I'm So Worried...

A few posts back, I wrote about poor Miss Hibiscus not liking the cold front enclosed porch.  She was all droopy and sad, so I moved her to the warm dining room.  At first, she was doing great, she liked the warmth and her leaves perked right up and she wasn't droopy anymore.  Then yesterday, I noticed the following.  Her leaves are turning yellow! (SIGH)  What the @#$%&#!  I have no idea what's going on with fickle Miss Hibiscus.  At first, I thought maybe I was over watering the plant.  However, when I touched the soil, it was not over watered or dry.  So I thought perhaps she wasn't getting enough sun.  It's not "sunny" in the dining room, but it is bright.  I decided to move her into the kitchen where it gets morning sun.  Do you have any ideas what may be happening, what is causing the leaves to turn yellow?  I'm so worried that this plant will kick the bucket.  Argh!

8 comments:

  1. There are a number of deficiencies and/or problems that would cause your hibiscus's leaves to turn yellow. The term for leaves turning yellow is "chlorosis." You'll come up with lots of info if you Google Chlorosis hibiscus. It looks like the most common cause of this symptom is an iron deficiency in the soil.

    Hope that helps.

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  2. Could possibly be a reaction if there was a drastic change in temperature, I have had citrus plants yellow and drop leaves when I bring them indoors form cold weather. (They always recover.) Hopefully some research, food and TLC will have your plant happy and healthy soon!

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  3. This is very common for Hibiscus when they come inside for the winter. Two factors that contribute are light and temperature. First, the plant got probably a little too cold out on the porch. Second, this is a full sun outdoor plant. Even if you gave it full sun indoors, it would be getting less than half the light intensity it was getting outdoors (glass absorbs/deflects a lot of light). But it may come back. Put it in your absolute sunniest spot and wait. You're right not to over water. Also, check for insects. Hibiscus are prone to several different insect pests and if they suck too much chlorophyll out of the leaves, the leaves turn yellow. I just found hordes of aphids on my mothers hibiscus (inside for the winter) and she hadn't even noticed. Good luck.

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  4. It could be many things, including shock from when she was so wilted and then revived. I have had plants that were very wilted and almost died. After I revived them, they lost many leaves. Maybe some fertilizer for now. She may also need a larger pot.

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  5. Is it possible that these are the leaves that wilted the most out on the porch, and they were damaged to the point that the plant is going to shed them so it can maintain its growth?

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  6. I was thinking more sun... but, could be anything.

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  7. I'm not a hibiscus expert, but have seen similar damage on plants which got too cold before being brought in. If that's the problem, they'll drop off but the remainder of the leaves will be healthy. I also notice most of the leaves are towards the bottom of the plant, on the old growth so they may just be ready for dropping off anyway.

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  8. I would definitely try some fertilizer - you could try an organic one of course...

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