Tuesday, October 26, 2010

First Garlic Bed: And a Bit Worried

So I planted garlic over 2 weeks ago and for mulch I put leaves over the bed.  I haven't watered the bed at all, but it's rained a few times since planting the cloves.
Then today, on closer inspection I noticed that some of the cloves have sprouted!  This is my first time growing garlic, so I don't know if this is a good or bad thing.  I'm so worried now that I may have planted my garlic too early??  Should this happen so soon after planting cloves?  I'm seeking advice / tips from all those gardeners out there that plant garlic.  Should I be worried?  Should I do anything?  Add more mulch maybe?  Help!!

15 comments:

  1. Don't worry, the garlic will be fine. I plant mine in September or October and it will sprout before the winter. I would mulch it with several inches of straw though. I don't know if the leaves will be enough.

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  2. I grew garlic last year and pretty much did what you did, I mulched and waited but I didn't do anything else. Always exciting growing something new, thats whats so great - it's new every time!

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  3. No worries. It is ok if your garlic begins to sprout. It will stop growing when the temperature gets colder and the new sprouts will die back. By spring time, the garlic will begin to grow again.

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  4. Not too worry, your garlic is doing just fine! It will grow all through winter then in spring the greenery will really take off. I've grown garlic for years and it's one of the easiest things to grow. Top dress it with fertilizer in March and when the tops almost die back completely, dig up your goodies. (If yours develop swellings on the stems in early summer, those are called scapes (flower buds). Cut them off before they open and enjoy them in your favorite dishes.)

    Good luck with your new crop.

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  5. From everything that I've read, it's the correct time of year.

    Good luck with them.

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  6. LOL, that's perfect! That's exactly what you want to see with fall planted garlic. Don't worry a bit, it will grow until it senses it's too cold, will remain green and dormant for awhile and start regrowing early about Feb/early March. The green growth in the fall is actually desired, that's what gives you a head start on spring growth. The fall planted stuff is usually better sized and a bonus you will be able to harvest earlier than spring planted garlic so you can get that bed space back sooner! good job!

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  7. here's a photo of my garlic growth going into December last year, I would have more but I got them planted late, look for the garlic/pansy pic http://gardennow-thinklater.blogspot.com/2009/12/did-someone-say-she-has-tomatoes.html

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  8. That is quick, but since I don't plant garlic in autumn I'm not sure if it's unusual or not. How deep did you plant them? They should be at least 4 inches down.

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  9. It's all good, garlic is very cold hardy and will sprout an bit and put down roots before hibernating during the cold months. The only thing that ever seems to bother ours is too much rainy cold weather in the winter instead of snow. I think your timing is right on.:)

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  10. I'm enjoying your blog! While I have never had garlic sprout early, I don't think I'd worry. I cover my cloves with 2" of soil and about 6" of lofty straw mulch, and normally plant (in northeast PA) around the same time you did. I base the not worrying on the fact that flower bulbs sometimes come up early - in a warm winter spell, or even fall - and they weather the winter just fine. I figure garlic is just as hardy. Can you get some straw (which doesn't get as wet/sodden as leaves) to put over the garlic? Being in the dark might slow their growth.

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  11. I've only grown garlic a couple of times and don't really remember how soon they sprout. I'm sure they'll be fine though.

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  12. Looks just perfect! I'll have to check mine to see if there's any growth yet. It's nice because the fall growth is just enought to remind you where not to step in the spring! The only thing I might suggest (not that you asked) is to chop up the leaves with a mower first. Sometimes wet whole leaves can get compacted and stifle what's underneath.

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  13. I've never grown garlic before so I can't help you much... rather just to say kudos to you for trying new things! That's been my mode of gardening for over 30 years. Better to have tried and failed than not to have tried at all? BTW, no snow yet in my gardens, just in my beautiful mountains. Sun is shining here today after a hard frost this morning. I'm off to survey the damage.

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  14. Thanks for dropping by my wee Irish garden blog! I have no experience of growing garlic but I've learned loads from your post and everyone's comments. All the best, Kelli.

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  15. Like others have mentioned sometimes the conditions are just right and they're sprout, but they should be ok and the minor leaf loss won't really affect production next spring.

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